National Cruelty Line: 0300 1234 999
Medway West Branch
Charity Number: 209192

RSPCA Medway West Branch
Charity Number:209192

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Adopt A Pet

                Looking To Adopt A Cat Or Dog??


         Medway West Branch unfortunately doesn't take in  

                                     Cats and Dogs, 


We have compiled a list (that can be viewed on this page) to help people find centres that rehome and take in both Cats and Dogs.

Looking To Adopt A Rabbit??

If you can answer yes to the list below please take a look at the rabbits in our care


Things To Consider:


Rabbits can be playful, friendly and loving animals if treated right. Many rabbits come into rescue centres due to not being handled or treated properly, so some can be temperamental. Rabbits can be housed both indoors and outdoors. When housed outdoors, rabbits will need a large hutch and an exercise area. Rabbits need plenty of exercise and toys to play with to keep them from getting bored. The cage must be cleaned regularly to prevent diseases. Like cats and dogs rabbits also need vaccinations. An average age of a rabbit is 6-10 years.



What rabbits need. Can you provide the following?

  • Companionship - To ideally be with other rabbits or humans.                                                                                                                                                     The widespread practice of keeping rabbits and guinea pigs together is not recommended.
  • A balanced diet and a good quantity of hay.
  • A constant supply of fresh, clean drinking water in a drip feed bottle with metal spout. (Some rabbits will only drink from a bowl though.)
  • A large weatherproof home off the ground, out of direct sunlight and strong winds. 
  • A clean layer of wood shavings and plenty of hay or straw for bedding.
  • Daily exercise.
  • Rabbits burrow, so ensure the enclosure is sunk into the ground, escape-proof and safe from predators.
  • Their home to be cleaned every day and bedding changed weekly.
  • A gnawing block to wear down long teeth.
  • To be brushed every day if they have a long coat.  
  • Injections to prevent serious diseases.
  • To be taken to a vet if they are ill or injured.
  • To be looked after when you are on holiday.

Looking To Adopt A Guinea Pig??

If you can answer yes to the list below please take a look at the guinea pigs that are in our care.

Things to consider:
 

Guinea pigs are friendly and easily tamed, but they need commitment and regular attention. Long-haired guinea pigs can be especially difficult to look after. Guinea Pigs can be very skittish and very fast, so should have regular handling. Guinea pigs should have a supply of fresh vegetables on a daily basis and occasionally some fruit as a treat. An average age of a guinea pig is 6-8 years.



What guinea pigs need. Can you provide the following?

  • Companionship - To be with other guinea pigs, most guinea pigs live happily in pairs or small groups although occasionally a guinea pig will prefer to be on its own. The widespread practice of keeping guinea pigs and rabbits together is not recommended.
  • Feeding a balanced diet, with daily vegetables and hay.
  • A constant supply of fresh, clean drinking water in a drip feed bottle with a metal spout.
  • A large weatherproof home kept off the ground, out of direct sunlight and strong winds. 
  • A clean layer of wood shavings on the floor of their home and plenty of soft hay or straw for bedding and burrowing.
  • Daily exercise.
  • Their home to be cleaned every day and bedding changed weekly.
  • A gnawing block to wear down long teeth.
  • To be brushed every day if they have a long or rough-haired coat.
  • Some quiet time alone or with other guinea pigs every day.
  • To be taken to a vet if they are ill or injured.
  • To be looked after when you are on holiday.
Looking To Adopt A Rodent?? (i.e. Mouse, Rat, Hamster or Gerbil)


Things to consider:


If you're thinking about adopting a rodent, whether a rat, some mice or a gerbil or two, there are certain things you need to consider before deciding which species you'd be best suited to. Some rodents are a lot easier to look after than others.

  • It's essential to invest in the right cage for your pet or pets, so they don't escape or injure themselves.
  • You need to understand your pet's nutritional needs so they get all the vitamins, minerals and nutrients they need to stay healthy.
  • You also need to make sure you use the right sort of bedding for your pet. There are some types which are dangerous to certain rodents and which will harm their respiratory systems.
  • You need to provide toys for your adopted pet so they are kept entertained when you're not around. However, you have to make sure the toys you give them are suitable and safe for them to use.
  • You have to be sure you have the time to keep their cages clean. They need to be in a draught free place and kept at a regular temperature.
  • To be taken to a vet if they are ill or injured.
  • To be looked after when you are on holiday.

What About Adopting a Rat?

Rats make wonderful pets and love being handled. They live longer than mice with an average life span of around 2 to 4 years – sometimes even longer. Rats are incredibly social creatures and do well when kept in same sex pairs. If regularly handled, rats become very tame and enjoy human contact and companionship. However, they need more in the way of exercise than some other rodents, and need to be taken out of their cages on a daily basis.


What About A Hamster or a Gerbil?

Both hamsters and gerbils have life spans of around 2 to 3 years and whereas hamsters like to lead solitary lives, gerbils on the other hand, are very social creatures preferring to be kept with others of their kind. Dwarf hamsters are incredibly cute and are very popular pets these days, although they have earned themselves a reputation as biters which is why they need to be well handled. Hamsters and Gerbils require different habitats.


What About A Mouse?

Fancy mice make great pets and live for around 1 to 3 years. They are really easy to keep but mice need to be kept in same sex pairs or small groups. The thing to bear in mind is male mice tend to fight each other which is something to watch out for.

Mice are very entertaining to watch and make great pets for older children as long as they understand their pet's daily needs and the importance of cleaning out their cages regularly.

Looking To Adopt A Reptile/Exotic?
We occasionally have the following for adoption, please take a look as to what we have in care at present.

Giant African Land Snails

About:


Giant African land snails have dark brown shells with fawn and white markings; their bodies are brown and patterned with purple, white and fawn marks. Depending on the species, a land snail shell can measure between 10-20cm long, with the less commonly kept Achatina achatina being the largest land snail. Giant African land snails are nocturnal.

 

Things to know:


Snails should be picked up very gently by their shells – its best to pick them up when they are resting on the soil floor of their home rather than when they are stuck tightly to its glass.


Things to consider:


Health issues

  • Dehydration
  • Calcium deficiency
  • Exposure to chemicals
  • Skin problems
  • Broken shells

A healthy snail will have a clean unbroken shell and no unusual lumps, bumps and patches on its body.

 

Cleaning out, bedding and food:


  • Giant African land snails will need a well-ventilated glass or sturdy plastic tank with a secure lid.
  • Two land snails will need an enclosure measuring 60cm long x 45cm wide x 40cm high. More snails will need a larger tank.
  • The enclosure should have 3-6cm layers of peat substitute on the floor that needs to be kept moist but not soaking.
  • Avoid using soil from the garden as it may be to stony and include fertilizers or other chemicals.
  • Snails should be kept at temperatures of 21-23’C
  • A heat pad can be used under half of the tank unless the room they are kept in maintains the appropriate temperature in the tank.
  • A water bowl should be placed in the enclosure for the snails to drink from and to help maintain humidity.
  • The tank should also be misted lightly.
  • Leafy greens including lettuce, cabbage, spinach, watercress, land cress, dandelions, and grass should all be on the land snail’s menu.    

Corn Snakes and Common Rat Snakes


About:


Corn snakes have been selectively bred in captivity, resulting in a wide range of different varieties, or morphs. Corn snakes grow to a length of 1-1.2m within 3-4 years in captivity, but can grow up to 1.8m. Rat snakes can grow to 2m, but rarely in captivity Rat snakes reach full size in 5years. These snakes commonly live for 12 years in captivity.

 

Things to know and consider:


Health issues to think about when taking on theses snakes;


  • Bone disease
  • Burns from incorrect lighting and heating
  • Inability to shed or slough skin
  • Respiratory infections
  • Internal/External parasites
  • Mouth rot
  • Dehydration
  • Anorexia
  • Digestive problems


Cleaning, bedding and food:


  • These snakes are solitary in the wild. The can be housed alone or, if each snake is provided with adequate space and access to refuges, small groups of similar sized snakes can be kept together.
  • A pair of snakes would need a vivarium with a minimum length that is as long as the largest snake and measures 50cm wide and 50cm high, to provide the space needed to maintain the range of temperatures and access to the refuges.
  • The vivarium will need a hide box, paper towel lining, rough stone, ventilation and will need to be escape proof.
  • The vivarium will need a day temperature of 24-27’C reducing to 21’C at night. It will also need a basking spot at 30’C
  • Both types of snake should be fed on mice and small rats the mice should be freshly killed or frozen and fully defrosted.
  • They will need fresh water in a heavy bowl they can not tip over.